Title:
The Impact of Gender, Race, and Income on Transit Travel Behavior in Boston and Atlanta

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Van Dyke, Rebecca S.
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Abstract
This paper examines the relationship of gender and race to transit trip length. These factors are critical to planning practitioners and transportation policy-makers as they work to achieve equitable systems. In the past, transit-dependent riders, or those groups who rely on public transit as their main mode of transportation, have been the poor and members of minority groups including women, with the exception of the dense centers of cities like New York and San Francisco. These travelers are often inner-city residents who depend heavily on buses and subways. Meanwhile “choice riders” have been primarily wealthier, White suburban automobile owners who have the time and monetary flexibility to select modes like express buses and commuter rail (Garrett and Taylor, 1999). Consequently, when transit policies favor new commuter lines that mostly serve affluent “choice riders,” an important question of fairness arises.
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2018-05
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Masters Project
Applied Research Paper
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