Title:
Ground-water Management in Coastal Georgia and Adjacent Parts of South Carolina and Florida: I. Ground-water Resources and Constraints to Development

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Author(s)
Krause, Richard E.
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Editor(s)
Hatcher, Kathryn J.
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Abstract
Current use and future demands for water in the coastal area of Georgia and adjacent parts of South Carolina and Florida affect all three States. Pumpage from the Floridan aquifer system—an extremely permeable, paleokarst, carbonate water-bearing sequence—has resulted in substantial water-level declines and subsequent encroachment of seawater into the aquifer at the northern end of Hilton Head Island, South Carolina; and in saltwater intrusion of the aquifer at Brunswick, Georgia; and near Jacksonville, Florida. Although the mechanisms vary by which encroachment and intrusion occur, all hypotheses indicate that pumpage from the Floridan aquifer system has caused ground-water level decline and a reduction in hydrostatic pressure, and has allowed saltwater to enter the freshwater part of the system. This situation has constrained further development of the Floridan aquifer system in the coastal area.
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Sponsored and Organized by: U.S. Geological Survey, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Georgia State University, Georgia Institute of Technology
Date Issued
1997-03
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Text
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Proceedings
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