Title:
Quantitative System for Technical Assessment and Training of Skills (STATS) for Surgical Performance

No Thumbnail Available
Author(s)
Krovi, Venkat N.
Authors
Advisor(s)
Advisor(s)
Editor(s)
Associated Organization(s)
Series
Collections
Supplementary to
Abstract
Surgical procedural performance involves interplay of a highly dynamic system of intercoupled perceptual, sensory, and cognitive components—at the current stage, however, our focus is on sensorimotor procedural performance. Our operant hypothesis is that while human manipulation behavior may be based on the dynamic interaction between the neuromuscular system and its dynamic environment (human-machine interface + task dynamics), it becomes manifest in the ensuing spatiotemporal patterns. Hence, we take a sensing/systems perspective and propose to track, measure and record, under carefully controlled conditions, low-level dynamic behaviors of users (novitiates to experts) as they perform skilled surgical tasks. Our immediate goal is to then determine the underlying structure (“skill-level” or “signature”) of a proceduralist, with its clear ramifications to accreditation and certification, despite the significant spatiotemporal variability of populations (human), coupling characteristics (device), and the interactions (environment). We will present early results from our skill assessment implementation efforts in two contexts: (A) The da Vinci Robotic Minimally Invasive Surgery (RMIS) case that involves multi-degree-of-freedom dexterous motion components, features better instrumentation and sensing, but is currently performed without haptic feedback; and (B) Percutaneous Kidney Biopsy case that initially is more unstructured and open-ended but ultimately has more-constrained (1 DOF) motions, yet depends critically on the sense of touch.
Sponsor
Date Issued
2014-10-08
Extent
55:49 minutes
Resource Type
Moving Image
Resource Subtype
Lecture
Rights Statement
Rights URI